How can God be “three-in-one”?

Tonight we began our four week exploration of the Apostle’s Creed. We’ll be exploring the Creed as the Faith Statement of our church as a whole and we will be tying that into the faith statements we’ll begin working on this weekend on the CREW Retreat. So as we look at the Apostle’s Creed as a whole, the Trinity is the first big idea most everyone, from middle school students to long-time pastors, struggle with. Tonight we’ll be asking the question:

How can God be “three-in-one”?

While not explicitly spelled out in the Bible, the early church combined two words (tri- meaning “threeness” and -unitas meaning “oneness”) to describe the movements of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit that they found in Scripture. The Council of Nicea in 325 C.E. wrote that God is constituted by three persons, but by one substance. This concept explained how Jesus of Nazareth could both be God incarnate and be in a prayer-relationship with God.

Another way to understand the Trinity is to focus not so much on the three “persons,” but on the relationship that binds the three. That eternal, divine relationship can be understood as a mutual indwelling or as a reciprocal enveloping, each of the other two. When this understanding is applied, the incarnation of Jesus is seen as the invitation by God for human beings to enter this relationship, and the crucifixion is God’s own experience of broken relationship and godforsakenness.

Tonight, we started off with the idea of a Father simultaneously being a dad, a husband, and a son. Although he is just one person, he plays at least three distinct roles in his life. This analogy, as with all analogies, ultimately falls short of totally explaining the Trinity. So we turned to scripture to see how Christ calls us to believe things which may be impossible for us to comprehend. Then for our small group activity we took time to create Poetic Analogies for things from a chair to the spleen and preformed our poems for our small groups.

This week’s Take Home Assignment is to create a genogram of each students family or close friends. Using symbols, students will create a picture of the relationships within their own family and use that to explore the relationships that exist within the Trinity.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *